Path Less Traveled

forest-438432_1280Avoiding the Beaten Path in Prague

Prague is best described as an eclectic mix of old and new, where history can be seen and felt no matter where you are. Whether you are dancing the night away in a modern club housed in a two hundred year old building or eating traditional Czech food in a centuries-old restaurant along a winding, cobbled street, you will feel the past merging fluidly with the present.

In the last few years people have begun to recognize Prague as a melting pot of culture, entertainment and beauty, which has increased the tourist traffic dramatically. For those of us who want to experience all that Prague has to offer while avoiding the crowds of people flocking to the most well-known venues, here 4 alternative experiences that can only be found in Prague.

 

Vyšehrad (High Castle)

Though much less well-known than the Prague Castle, Vyšehrad is a favorite spot for locals because of the amazing view of the city, the popular beer garden located on the grounds, and the castle cemetery which is full of famous Czech people. At Vyšehrad you can drink like a local while looking at the graves of the more permanent locals.

 

Františkánská zahrada (Franciscan Garden)

 

Experience a peaceful oasis just off the famous (and famously busy) Wenceslas Square. The Františkánská zahrada is a small garden that was established in 1348 and which offers an ideal escape from the crowds without being completely removed from the energy of the city.

 

Grand Café Orient

This café, which is the only one of its kind, can be found on the first floor of the House of the Black Madonna. The uniqueness comes from the fact that the Grand Café Orient is the only café built and decorated solely in the cubist style, which is a method of design that fell out of style quickly after it became popular. When you visit the Grand Café Orient, be sure to try the traditional Kubistický v?ne?ek cake, which is translated best as “cubist wreath.”

 

David ?erný

The artwork produced by David ?erný can be described as controversial, entertaining or offensive, depending on who you ask. Experience some of his creations for yourself – they are located all over Prague. Some of his more talked-about pieces include a statue of St. Wenceslas riding a dead horse, which is located in the central atrium at the Lucerna Palace, and “Tower Babies,” which are cast figures attached to the Žižkov Television Tower.

Whether you have a day, semester, or year to explore Prague, you will never be lacking in places to see and experience. Whatever you are interested in – food, art, history or nightlife – Prague will not disappoint.