Heal Thyself!

Summer has finally started to make way for fall, and with the new season comes all the assorted fun: brisker temps, changing leaves, more passionate football rivalries, and pumpkin-flavored EVERYTHING.

What also joins the party is that least-welcome of autumn happenings: the common cold. Here at Panrimo we guzzled chicken noodle soup until we were (figuratively) sick of it. Which got us to thinking, how do people cope with colds elsewhere? Read on to find the international cold-cures we liked the best.

7) Garlic and Onion Omelettes (Morocco)

Garlic has long been touted as a cure-all, so combining its power with the vitamins found in onions and eggs is an excellent way to give your body the help it needs to banish infection. This isn’t an omelette in the American sense, but instead takes the form of a Spanish omelette. Heat olive oil in a pan with pepper. Whisk your eggs and pour them into one thin layer, adding the crushed garlic and chopped onions while the egg is still cooking. Flip it once (as you would a pancake) and serve.

6) Habanero Peppers (Mexico)

This cure requires no cooking and very little explanation. Procure a habanero pepper. Eat it. Wait as all your sinuses empty out at once. (It might be best to have tissues handy) This might seem like a rather questionable method from a nutrients point of view, but the capsaicin in peppers is actually really good for clearing that icky, thick mucus that builds up when you’re sick. If you can stand the pain, this is the way to go.

5) Onion Juice (European)

This won’t do your breath any favors, but it will provide you with the vitamins B and C that your body needs when you’re sick. Slice an onion and put it into a bowl or mason jar. Cover the onion with sugar to draw out the juices. Wait for the liquid to accumulate. Drink. (It might be best to follow up with some tic-tacs or something)

4) Hot Beer (Russia)

Is it any surprise that the Russians have discovered a sure-fire way to beat colds that involves alcohol? Hot beer may seem too good to be true, but this is 100% legit and it actually works. Choose your favorite brew and pour it into a saucepan. Heat the beer to the hottest temperature you can drink safely, and bottoms up! (We don’t encourage chugging hot beer. You’ll make your sore throat far worse) Cheers.

3) Plum Tea (Japan)

The Japanese diet is one of the healthiest in the world, so their cure for the common cold pulls no punches. The Japanese swear by the power of their sour/salty pickled plums (known as umeboshi). Grill the pickled plum on the stove until it’s singed. Place it in a teacup and pour freshly brewed green tea over the top. Drink. The plums are full of citric acid which pairs with the anti-oxidizing properties of the tea to provide a hot drink more effective than your average glass of orange juice.

2) Honey Pepper Syrup (South Africa)

Why pay money for icky-tasting cough syrup at the local pharmacy when you can make your own, super-effective version at home? The recipe is simple: 1 teaspoon black pepper, 1 teaspoon honey, 3 cups of water. Boil the black pepper in the water for 10 minutes, mix in the honey, then sip it down. This spicy/sweet syrup will go to work almost immediately, soothing your sore throat, and because there aren’t any medicines or chemical overdoses to worry about, you can have it more than once every 4 hours. Relief!

1) Anything With Ginger (So Many Places…)

Ginger is amazing and everyone knows it. Most cultures, be they Asian, European, or American, have some sort of medicine utilizing ginger, so it should come as no surprise that it’s the root of common cold cures (ha HA!). There are more recipes and preparations than anyone could attempt over the course of a cold, but our go-to is a simple ginger tea. Slice ginger root and place in a saucepan. Cover with cold water and bring to a boil. Pour into your favorite mug, add some honey and voila! The perfect drink to clear your nose and soothe your throat.

Good luck cold-sufferers! May you be back to healthy soon.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *